Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the Greens, have joined the SNP in Holyrood to withhold consent for the UK Tory government’s controversial Internal Market Bill.

The bill has been widely criticised from groups such as the National Farmers Union of Scotland who warned the proposals “limit the devolved administrations”, the House of Commons Constitutional Affairs Committee who said the bill will “create new reservations in areas of devolved competence”, and the General Teaching Council for Scotland who warned it undermines devolved education functions.

Yet, Boris Johnson’s Scottish Secretary, Alister Jack, was accused of promoting a “childish and dangerous” ideology earlier this week after claiming he likes the Power Grab bill “even more” because it is opposed to by the SNP.

Yesterday, Scotland’s trade union movement backed the country’s right to hold an independence referendum should Westminster impose the bill against Holyrood’s wishes.  

Bruce Crawford MSP said:

‘Parties at Holyrood have united to join the growing number of voices right across Scottish civic society, including trade unions, industry experts, businesses and law makers, to call out this Bill for what it is: a shameless attempt by Westminster to undermine the Scottish Parliament and devolution itself.’

The UK Government’s actions, attitude and intentions with this reckless Bill, which they have admitted openly breaches international law, demonstrates the unwelcome trajectory of the United Kingdom. It’s a future more and more Scots want no part of, and many are instead taking a fresh look at Scotland’s potential as an independent European country.’

Alyn Smith MP added:

‘For a government of self-confessed Unionists, the UK Government continues to inflict real constitutional vandalism on Scotland and its institutions. The UK Internal Market Bill blatantly breaches international law, and has been rejected by Scotland’s Parliament and many sections of Scottish civic society.

‘Consistently the Scottish Government and other devolved governments have tried to engage the UK government constructively on post-Brexit frameworks and other arrangements, but trust is at an all-time low.

‘Increasingly, as evidenced by recent polling, Scots are looking at independence with renewed confidence – where Scotland can take its place back at the decision-making tables of Europe as an equal partner.’